Get Behind Me, Salad

commovente:

Hangzhou, China: A piece of graphene aerogel developed at Zhejiang University is placed on a cherry flower. The sponge-like matter weighs 0.16 milligrams per cubic centimetre and is the world’s lightest solid material.

commovente:

Hangzhou, China: A piece of graphene aerogel developed at Zhejiang University is placed on a cherry flower. The sponge-like matter weighs 0.16 milligrams per cubic centimetre and is the world’s lightest solid material.

(via freshphotons)

broadcastarchive-umd:

magictransistor:

Radio Kootwijk.

Radio Kootwijk is a small town in the Dutch municipality of Apeldoorn, with approximately 120 inhabitants (in 2006). The housing accommodations of Radio Kootwijk arose as a result of the building of a shortwave transmitter site with the same name, starting in 1918.

The transmitters played an important role in the 20th century as a communication facility between the Netherlands and its then colony of Dutch East Indies. By 1925 the longwave transmitter was changed by a shortwave tube based, electronic transmitter which had a much better performance due to the better propagation of shortwaves. With this new technology, in 1928 a radio-telephonic connection was established.

Due to the development of new technologies like satellite communication, Radio Kootwijk lost its position as main overseas wireless connection point of the Netherlands. In 1980, the last transmission mast was blown up. In 2004 the park lost its last transmitter functions.

The main building of the former transmitter park, designed by Dutch architect Julius Maria Luthmann and named ‘Building A’, ‘The Cathedral’ or sometimes ‘The Sphynx’, was officially appointed as a monument. It is used as venue and scenery for several cultural events and film productions. (Wikipedia)

natgeofound:

A solitary fisherman’s home keeps watch on quiet Placentia Bay in Newfoundland, Canada, 1974.Photograph by Sam Abell, National Geographic Creative

natgeofound:

A solitary fisherman’s home keeps watch on quiet Placentia Bay in Newfoundland, Canada, 1974.Photograph by Sam Abell, National Geographic Creative